Buson : Haiku

Yosa Buson

Translated from the Japanese by Franz Wright

26 pages / hand-stitched, limited-edition pamphlet / $10.00
ISBN-13: 978-1-935635-12-3

/ $
ISBN-13:


This collection of thirty-nine haiku from Yosa Buson showcases the mastery, delicacy, and mystery of one of Japan's greatest and most deeply admired poets. With this publication, Pulitzer Prize winner Franz Wright offers readers a new avenue into one of poetry's essential voices.

In this edition, 26 copies have been hand-bound into cloth-covered boards. $75. For order inquiries, contact info@tavernbooks.org.




About Franz Wright

Since the mid-seventies, when he was still a student at Oberlin College, Franz Wright has published over twenty-five collections of poetry, often under the imprint of small private presses, with Oberlin College Press, or with his primary publisher since 2001, Alfred A. Knopf in New York. In the decade between 2001 and 2011, he has published six major collections, including Walking to Martha's Vineyard, which received the Pulitzer Prize in 2004, and The Beforelife, Wheeling Motel, and Kindertotenwald, a book of sixty-five prose works and a single lyric poem addressed to his wife, Elizabeth Oehlkers Wright, accomplished translator, photographer, and writer of experimental prose. He and she are currently working together on a number of projects, while he continues to publish numerous chapbooks with small presses including Marick Press, Chester River Press, Back Pages Books, and Tavern Books. He has recently finished a new full-length collection of poems entitled F, and is halfway into another collection entitled Seige's End. Over the years he has gratefully received financial assistance in the form of fellowships and awards from the Guggenheim and Whiting Foundations, PEN, the Academy of Arts & Sciences, the Provincetown Fine Arts Work Center, and the National Endowment For the Arts. He and his father, the legendary James Wright, are the only father and son recipients of the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry.




"A unique and major talent."
— Donald Justice, on Franz Wright